• Identification00004209
  • TitleDescriptive inventory for the Changing Chicago photodocumentary archive, 1983-1989
  • PublisherChicago Historical Society
  • LanguageEnglish
  • RepositoryChicago History Museum Research Center 1601 North Clark Street Chicago, IL 60614-6038
  • Date1983-1989
  • OriginationFocus/Infinity Fund (Chicago, Ill.) Changing Chicago (Photography project : Chicago, Ill.)
  • Physical Description
    • 2201 photographic prints : b&w ; 20 x 24 in. and smaller
    • 206 photomechanical prints : photocopies ; 8 x 10 in.
    • 864 photographic prints : col. ; 20 x 24 in. and smaller
    • 142 transparencies : slide, col. ; 35 mm
    • 14 transparencies : col. ; 4 x 5 in.
    • 1776 negatives : col. ; 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 in.
    • 453 negatives: col. ; 35 mm
    • 11 negatives : b&w ; 8 x 10 in.
  • Location
    • 1991.0369 PPL
    • 1991.0369 PCP-0098-0106
    • 1991.0369 PCT-0131
    • 1991.0369 PCN-0021

Gift of the Focus/Infinity Fund and participating photographers, (accession #: 1991.0369).

Credit photographer.

Licensing of photographs in series 28 and 32 is restricted, but materials may be photocopied for research use.

Advance appointment required to view color material, b&w negatives, and transparencies in cold storage.

Changing Chicago photodocumentary archive, 1983-1989 (Chicago History Museum) plus a detailed description, date, and series/box/folder number of a specific item.

Related materials at Chicago History Museum include the Changing Chicago interviews with photographers (sound recordings and transcripts) and the publication: Changing Chicago : a photodocumentary / preface by Jack Jaffe ; introduction by Walter Rosenblum ; essays by Naomi Rosenblum and Larry Heinemann; as well as the Ron Gordon visual materials (2016.0016).

Selected photographs exhibited at Chicago Historical Society and other Chicago institutions; organized by Focus/Infinity Fund, 1989.

Exhibition photographic prints and work photographic prints created for the Changing Chicago photodocumentary project sponsored by the Focus/Infinity Fund of Chicago. Includes the work of thirty-two commissioned photographers addressing topics spanning people (workers in various jobs, schools, parties, weddings, etc.), communities, ethnic customs, events (parades, festivals), the built environment (tall buildings, industrial sites, waterways, etc.), and social problems in the Chicago metropolitan area, including northern Indiana, during the late 1980s. Portrait photographs of the participating photographers also are included in the collection.

Works by the following photographers are included in the collection: Tom Arndt, David Avison, Dick Blau, Jay Boersma, Patty Carroll, Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman, Kathleen Collins, Kerry Coppin, Susan Crocker, David Dapogny, Lloyd DeGrane, Meg Gerken, Ron Gordon, Peter Hales, Tom Harney, Tom Hocker, Jim Iska, Angela Kelly, John Kimmich, Jay King, Rhondal McKinney, Stephen Marc, James Newberry, Antonio Perez, Tom Petrillo, Russell B. Phillips, Melissa Ann Pinney, Marc PoKempner, Bob Thall, Jay Wolke, and Richard Younker.

The Changing Chicago project was initiated by Jack Jaffe and sponsored by the Focus/Infinity Fund of Chicago to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the discovery of photography and the 50th anniversary of the Farm Security Administration's (FSA) documentary project that famously depicted depression-era farmers. As an urban version of the FSA project, Changing Chicago produced approximately 600 exhibition prints from 33 photographers selected to contribute. Photographer Wayne Cable participated in the project although his works aren't represented in the collection. The project had three goals: the creation of this Changing Chicago archive to be housed at the Chicago Historical Society; the creation of curated exhibitions at participating institutions during the spring of 1989; and the publication of the book, Changing Chicago: A Photodocumentary. Participating organizations included Chicago Office of Fine Arts, Chicago Public Library Cultural Center, Museum of Contemporary Photography of Columbia College, Field Museum of Natural History, and the Chicago Historical Society.

Biographic information as of 1991 for 32 photographers contributing to the project's archive:

Thomas Frederick Arndt was born in 1944 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He received a bachelor's degree in fine arts from the Minneapolis College of Art and Design in 1968. He continued his education at the University of Minnesota during the years 1969-1971. In 1973 and again in 1983 he was a member of the Minnesota State Arts Board. In 1985, the Focus/Infinity Fund commissioned him to do a project entitled "Farm Families." In 1986 he received the Chicago Regents Park Artist-in-Residence Fellowship. He has exhibited his work at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis in 1974; Louisiana State University, New Orleans in 1975; the Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis in 1984; First Bank, Minneapolis-St. Paul, in 1988.

David Avison was born in 1937 in Harrisonburg, Virginia. He received a doctorate in physics in 1966 from Brown University. In 1974, he earned a master of science degree from the Institute of Design of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Avison taught physics at Brown University from 1959-1966 and at Purdue University from 1967-1969. From 1970-1986 he taught photography at Columbia College in Chicago. In 1977, he was a recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1980 Avison received an award from the Midwest Museum of American Art in Elkhart (Ind.) and in 1984 he served on the Illinois Arts Council in Chicago. Avison has had select exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1977; the Merwin Gallery at Illinois Wesleyan University in 1978; the Silver Image Gallery at Ohio State University in 1978; Odessa College in Texas in 1980; and the Swen Parson Gallery at Northern Illinois University in 1982.

Dick Blau was born in 1943 in New York City. He received a doctorate in American studies in 1973 from Yale University. He taught himself photography. He was an associate professor in American studies at the State University of New York, Buffalo, later becaming an associate professor in film at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. In 1965 he received a Fulbright Fellowship. In 1966, he received a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship. In 1978 and again in 1980 he received Wisconsin Arts Board Fellowships and in 1985 he received a research award from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. He has exhibited his work at the DeSaisset Art Gallery, Santa Clara (Calif.), 1975; the CEPA Gallery, Buffalo (N.Y.), 1975; the Perihelion Galleried, Milwaukee (Wis.), 1983.

Jay Boersma was born in Chicago in 1947. He earned his bachelor of arts in photography from Columbia College in Chicago in 1974. He received his master of fine arts in photography in 1976 from the Rhode Island School of Design. Boersma was an instructor of photography at Bradley University in Peoria (Ill.) from 1979 to 1981. He later became a photography professor at Governors State University in University Park, IL in 1982. He has displayed exhibitions at the Benson Hall Gallery at the Rhode Island School of Design in 1974 and 1976. His selected exhibitions also include Bradley University in 1977 and 1979; School of Art at the University of Denver in 1982; the Mitchell Museum in Mount Vernon (Ill.) in 1982; the Infinity Gallery at Governors State University in 1983; the Pittsburgh Filmmakers Gallery in 1983; the Southern Light Gallery in Amarillo (Tex.) in 1984 and the Gallery 2-D at Prairie State Community College in Chicago Heights in 1985.

Patty Carroll was born in Chicago in 1946. She got her bachelor of fine arts in graphic design in 1968 from the University of Illinois and a master of science in photography in 1972 from the Institute of Design of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Carroll instructed photography and drawing at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, (Penn.) from 1973 to 1974. She went on to instruct photography and graphic design at the University of Michigan from 1974 to 1976. In 1977 Carroll became a studio professor of photography at the Institute of Design of the Illinois Institute of Technology, while also starting a career as a freelance graphic designer. In 1979, 1980, 1984, 1986 and 1987 she was a visiting artist at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Carroll served on the Illinois Arts Council in 1977, 1981, 1984 and 1987. In 1981 she received a Polaroid Corporation Materials Grant as well as an Illinois Institute of Technology Faculty Research Fellowship in 1981. Her selected exhibitions include the CEPA Gallery in Buffalo (N.Y.) in 1980; Rhode Island School of Design in 1981 and 1984; Columbia College of Chicago Galleries in 1982; BC Space in Laguna Beach (Calif.) in 1983; Rush Rhees Fine Arts Gallery at the University of Rochester (N.Y.) 1984; Purdue University-Calumet in Hammond (Ind.) in 1985; the Artemisia Gallery in Chicago in 1985 and "Nightworks" at the Prairie State Community College in Chicago Heights in 1986.

Barbara Ciurej was born in Chicago in 1957. She received her bachelor's degree in visual design from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1978, later working with Lindsay Lochman in the field of graphic design.

Kathleen Collins was born in 1945 in Chicago. She received a bachelor's degree in psychology from Stanford University in 1967 and a master's degree in fine arts from Rochester Institute of Technology, 1978. In 1979 she received an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. She has exhibited her work at the Chicago Historical Society, 1982; Rochester Institute of Technology Photo Gallery, 1983; Indiana University Fine Arts Gallery, 1984; and the Village Gate Art Center of Rochester, 1986. Collins has also been an associate professor in the School of Photographic Arts and Sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology.

Kerry Coppin was born in Peekskill (N.Y.) in 1953. He earned his AAS of fashion photography in 1973 at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. In 1975 he received his bachelor of fine arts in photographic illustration from the Rochester Institute of Technology. In 1977, Coppin earned his master of fine arts of photography from the Rhode Island School of Design. In 1978 he took the positions of professor of photography in 1978 at Columbia College in Chicago and director of the Columbia College Workshop/Lecture Program. Coppin was an assistant in The Friends of Photography Workshop, "The Photograph was Document," in Carmel (Calif.) in 1983. In 1984 and 1985 he was a visiting instructor at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu. Coppin was an Artist in Residence at Lightwork in Syracuse (N.Y.) in 1986. His selected exhibitions include Gallery 417, PSCC in 1982 and "East of Eden," at The Art Loft Two in Honolulu in 1985.

Susan Crocker was born in New York City in 1940. She graduated from Briarcliff College in Briarcliff (N.Y.) in 1962. She was an instructor of photography at Manhattanville College in Purchase (N.Y.) in 1974 and also at Columbia College of Chicago from 1983 to 1985. She received the Illinois State Museum Purchase Award in 1985 and the Museum of Contemporary Photography of Columbia College Purchase Award in 1985. She was a member of the Illinois Arts Council in 1985 and 1986. Her selected exhibitions include the Illinois State Museum in Springfield in 1985.

David Dapogny was born in Berwyn (Ill.) in 1945. He received a bachelor's degree in English from University of Illinois in 1967 and a master of fine arts in photography from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1976. In 1978 he worked as a slide librarian at Colorado College. In 1978-1980 he worked as an audio-visual technician at the University of Alaska at Juneau, later becoming the director of the audio-visual department at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. He has exhibited his work at the Alaska State Museum in Juneau, 1984; Anchorage Historical and Fine Arts Museum in 1985; Infinity Gallery, Georgia State University; the Student Union Gallery, South Dakota University in 1986.

Lloyd DeGrane was born in Chicago in 1948. He attended Governor's State University in University Park (Ill.) from 1978-1980. DeGrane has worked as a free-lance photojournalist and documentary photographer. His selected group exhibitions include "New Horizons" at the Chicago Public Library Cultural Center from 1982-1984; "Illinois Photographers" at the State of Illinois Art Gallery in Chicago in 1985; "Small Works National" at the Zaner Gallery in Rochester, NY from 1982 through 1985.

Meg Gerken was born in Oelwin, Iowa in 1942. She earned her bachelor of arts at the University of Chicago in literature and art in 1964 and her master of arts in Russian Literature in 1968, also at the University of Chicago. She received her master of fine arts in photography in 1983 from the School of the Art Institute in Chicago. Gerken started as an associate professor of photography at Wright College in Chicago in 1968. She also started a career as a free-lance photographer in 1978. She was a member of the Illinois Arts Council in 1981 and 1986. Her selected exhibitions include "Visual Gossip" at Elmhurst College in Elmhurst, Ill. in 1979; Il Torrione in Ferrara, Italy in 1980; "celebration of the Human Family" at the John Hancock Center in Chicago in 1980; "Two Families" at the Palmer Square Arts Fair in Chicago in 1985 and "Bedrooms" at the Danzibao Gallery in Montreal in 1986. Her publications include "Meg Gerken, 'Two Families,'" in City in Winter, 1986.

Ron Gordon was born in Chicago in 1942. He received a bachelor's degree in language and literature from the University of Illinois, 1965, and a master's in literature in 1968. He has exhibited his work at the Galerie Minaca in Paris, 1983 and the American Institute of Architecture in 1988. He has owned a photography studio and printing lab.

Peter Bacon Hales was born in Pasadena (Calif.) in 1950. He received his bachelor of arts in 1972 in English and American literature at Haverford College. In 1976, he received his master of arts in American civilization from the University of Texas. In 1981, he earned his doctorate in American civilization from the University of Texas. From 1976 to 1979, Hales was an Associate Press wire photo photographer. From 1981 to 1985 he was a curator at the MoMing Gallery in Chicago. Starting in 1980, Hales was been an assistant and associate professor of the History of Architecture and Art department at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Hales was a recipient of the Rockefeller Foundation in 1987 and 1988. He was a member of the Illinois Arts Council in 1983. He received the University of Illinois at Chicago Silver Circle Teaching Award in 1984. In 1985 Hales received the Institute of Humanities Fellowship as well as the National Endowment for the Humanities. Hales was a recipient of the National Endowment for the Humanities in 1987 and 1988 as well. He was a University of Illinois University Scholar from 1985 to 1987. Hales' selected exhibitions include the Fourth Street Photo Gallery in New York City in 1976; San Francisco Camera Work in 1981; "Gates of Eden: Americans and the Land," at the Chicago Public Library Cultural Center in 1988. His publications include: Silver Cities: The Photography of American Urbanization, 1839-1915 (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1984); William Henry Jackson (London: MacDonald and Co., 1984) and William Henry Jackson and the Transformation of the American Landscape, 1843-1942 (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1988).

Tom Harney was born in Chicago in 1946. He received a bachelor's degree in business administration in 1968. From 1973-1974 he worked as a photographer for the Chicago Sun Times newspaper, then later as a free-lance photographer.. He has exhibited his work at the Madison Art Center, Madison, 1979; the ARC Gallery in Chicago, 1981; and the Truman Gallery in Chicago, 1981.

Tom Hocker was born in Sherman (Tex.) in 1943. He received a bachelor's degree in history from Rice University in 1966 and a master's degree in photography from Illinois Institute of Technology in 1969. He worked for the United States Army in 1969 and later taught at Purdue University in Calumet (Ind.). He has exhibited his work at the Northern Indiana Art Association, Hammond, 1980; the Lutheran Theological Seminary, Chicago, 1980; Lake County Court House, Crown Point, 1983; Gary Public Library, 1986; Michigan City Center for the Arts, Michigan City, 1987.

James Iska was born in 1958 in Chicago. He received his bachelor of science in photography in 1980 from the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. Iska has been a free-lance photographer since 1980 and an exhibition preparator at the Photography Collection of the Art Institute of Chicago since 1982. Iska's selected exhibitions include Kroch's and Brentano's Gallery in Chicago in 1986 and "Children of the Inner City" at the Rizzoli Gallery in Chicago in 1987.

Angela Kelly was born in Northern Ireland in 1950. She received an undergraduate degree in education from University of Nottingham in England, 1972, a bachelor's degree in creative photography from Trent Polytechnic, England in 1975, and a master's degree in photography from Columbia College in 1987. From 1979 to 1986 she served as a member of the Photography Subcommittee of the Arts Council in Great Britain. From 1982-1984 she taught at Columbia College in Chicago, later moving to a teaching position at the School of the Art Institute in Chicago. She has exhibited work at the Manchester Arts School in England, 1980; Viewpoints Gallery, England, 1987.

John Kimmich was born in Philadelphia in 1950. He received his bachelor's degree in architectural studies in 1973 from the University of Illinois and his master's degree in photography in 1978 from Purdue University-Calumet. Kimmich taught photography at Columbia College from 1978 to 1986. He was on the Illinois Arts Council in 1981, 1982, 1986 and 1987. In 1982 he was a member of the Chicago Council on Fine Arts. His selected exhibitions include the Chicago Public Library Cultural Center in 1982 and 1988; the Purdue University Creative Arts gallery in 1984; the Sol Mednick Gallery at the Philadelphia College of Arts in 1986; the Gauss Fotografis Galleri in Stockholm in 1986; and the Nueva Imagen Gallery in Spain in 1987.

Jay King was born in Chicago in 1944. He received his bachelor's degree in history from the University of Wisconsin--Madison in 1966. He taught himself photography. He became a free-lance commercial photographer in 1967. His selected exhibitions include Columbia College Galleries in Chicago in 1982. Additionally he has published several works.

Lindsay Lochman was born in 1952 in Chicago. She received her bachelor's degree in fine arts and history from American University in 1973, and a master's degree in visual design from Illinois Institute of Technology in 1977. She has since worked with Barbara Ciurej in the field of graphic design.

Stephen Marc was born in Rantoul, Illinois in 1954. He received his bachelor of fine arts from Pomona College in Claremont, California and his master of fine arts in photography in 1978 from the Tyler School of Art, Temple University, Philadelphia. In 1978, Marc started working as both an instructor at Columbia College and a freelance photographer. His awards include the Eli Weingard Chicago Grant in 1983. He has exhibited work at the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College in 1984 and the 2-D Photo Gallery at the Prairie State Community College in 1985. His publications include Urban Notations.

Rhondal McKinney was born in Effingham, Illinois in 1948. He received both bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Illinois. He served as a guest curator at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1981 to 1983. He has received awards from the Focus/Infinity Fund, 1985; and the Illinois Arts Council, 1986. His work has been exhibited at the Light Gallery in New York City, 1986; the Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, 1987; the University of Dayton, 1987; and the Kalamazoo Institute of Art, 1988. Additionally he has published various works. McKinney has taught at Illinois State University.

James Newberry was born in Indianapolis in 1937. He earned his bachelor's degree in photography in 1967 and his master's degree in photography in 1973 from the Institute of Design of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Newberry was the founding chair of Columbia College's Department of Photography from 1967 to 1975. Starting in 1979 he worked as an associate professor at East Texas State University. He received a Maryland Arts Council fellowship in 1977 and an East Texas State University research grant in 1981. His selected exhibitions include the Church Street Photographic Center in Melbourne, 1978; the Art Gallery at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, 1981; and the Chicago Historical Society, 1983.

Antonio Perez was born in Chicago in 1962. He received a bachelor's degree in photography in 1985 from Columbia College, Chicago. He has experience in portrait as well as journalistic photography. His awards include the Presidential Purchase Award and a National Community College Publication Photography Award. He has displayed his work at the Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, 1983 to 1985. He has worked for Triton College Publications in Chicago.

Tom Petrillo was born in Mckees Rocks, Pennsylvania in 1949. He received his bachelor's degree from Temple University in 1971 and his master of fine arts in 1973 from the University of New Mexico. He became a visiting instructor and assistant professor at the School of the Art Institute in 1974. From 1975 to 1977 he was an assistant professor at Southern Illinois University. Petrillo was an artist in residence in 1981 at the Exploratorium in San Francisco. He also has lectured at Northwestern University since 1981. His exhibitions include works at the International Center of Photography at the Education Gallery, New York City, 1981; the University of Arkansas, 1981; the Exploratorium, 1981; Columbia College Gallery, 1982; Tarrant County Junior College Gallery, Texas, 1984; and the Evanston Art Center in 1986.

Russell B. Phillips was born in Oklahoma City, 1954. He received a bachelor degree of fine arts from Kansas City Art Institute in 1977 and a master's degree in photography from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1985. He has exhibited his work at the Chicago Public Library Cultural Center in 1982; the Art Institute of Chicago, 1983; and the Chicago Historical Society in 1986.

Melissa Ann Pinney was born in St. Louis, 1953. She received a bachelor's degree in photography and a master's degree in photography from the University of Illinois Chicago Campus. From 1981 to 1984 she taught at Loyola University in Chicago. She has received grants from the Illinois Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her work has been exhibited at the Illinois State Museum, Springfield, 1983; the Artemesia Gallery, Chicago, 1985-1988. She later worked as a free-lance photographer and set designer in Chicago.

Marc PoKempner was born in Pottsville, Pennsylvania in 1948. He earned his bachelor's degree in philosophical psychology in 1973 and did graduate study in photography at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was the chief staff photographer at MIT's News office in 1971. Since 1973 he has been a freelance photojournalist. His selected exhibitions include "Salvadorian Refugees" at the Peace Museum in Chicago, 1982; "Blues Ain't News" at the Pallas Gallery, Chicago, 1984; "Picture Ceba" at the Chicago Public Library Cultural Center, 1986. Additionally, he has numerous publications.

Bob Thall was born in Evanston, Illinois in 1948. He earned his bachelor's degree in design photography in 1972 and his master's degree in photography in 1986 from the University of Illinois Chicago Campus. Thall became a photography professor at Columbia College in 1976 and a free-lance architectural photographer in 1975. He served on the Illinois Arts Council in 1980. His exhibitions include "Landscape-Cityscape" at the MoMing Art and Dance Center, Chicago, 1981; the Swen Parson Gallery at Northern Illinois University, 1982; Columbia College Gallery, 1983; Tarrant College Gallery, Texas, 1984; the University of Kansas Gallery in 1984; the Loyola University Gallery, Chicago, 1984; and the Illinois State Museum in Springfield, 1984.

Jay Wolke was born in Chicago, 1954. He received a bachelor's degree in fine arts from Washington University, St. Louis in 1976 and a master's degree in photography in 1980. He taught at the Illinois Institute of Technology from 1982 to 1983 and at Columbia College from 1980 to 1987. He has received awards from the Illinois State Museum Council in 1985, the Society for Contemporary Photography in 1985, the Illinois Arts Council in 1986, and the National Endowment for the Arts in 1986. He has exhibited work at the Popular Photography Art Gallery in New York City, 1985; the Chicago Historical Society, 1985; and the University of Notre Dame in 1986.

Richard Younker was born in 1945 in Chicago. In 1964 he received a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Chicago. He taught himself photography. He published numerous photographs in Chicago magazines and periodicals.

  • Subject
    • Changing Chicago (Photography project : Chicago, Ill.)--Archives
    • Chicago Historical Society. Changing Chicago (Exhibition : 1989)
    • African Americans--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Asian Americans--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Children--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Community life--Illinois--Chicago Metropolitan Area--1980-1989
    • Ethnicity--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Families--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Festivals--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Hispanic Americans--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Housing--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Leisure--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Parades & processions--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Public housing--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Steel industry--Illinois--Chicago Metropolitan Area--1980-1989
    • Streets--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Women--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Workers--Illinois--Chicago--1980-1989
    • Chicago (Ill.)--Communities--1980-1989
    • Chicago Metropolitan Area (Ill.)--Buildings, structures, etc.--1980-1989
    • Chicago Metropolitan Area (Ill.)--Social life and customs--1980-1989
  • Names
    • Arndt, Thomas Frederick, 1944- photographer
    • Avison, David, 1937- photographer
    • Blau, Dick, 1943- photographer
    • Boersma, Jay, 1947- photographer
    • Carroll, Patty, photographer
    • Ciurej, Barbara, 1957- photographer
    • Collins, Kathleen, 1945- photographer
    • Coppin, Kerry, 1953- photographer
    • Crocker, Susan, 1940- photographer
    • Dapogny, David, b. 1945, photographer
    • DeGrane, Lloyd, 1948- photographer
    • Gerken, Meg, 1942- photographer
    • Gordon, Ron, 1942- photographer
    • Hales, Peter B. (Peter Bacon), photographer
    • Harney, Tom, 1946- photographer
    • Hocker, Thomas, 1943- photographer
    • Iska, James, photographer
    • Kelly, Angela, photographer
    • Kimmich, John, 1950- photographer
    • King, Jay, 1944- photographer
    • Lochman, Lindsay, 1952- photographer
    • Marc, Stephen, photographer
    • McKinney, Rhondal, photographer
    • Newberry, James, 1937- photographer
    • Perez, Antonio, 1962- photographer
    • Petrillo, Tom, 1949- photographer
    • Phillips, Russell B., 1954- photographer
    • Pinney, Melissa, 1953- photographer
    • PoKempner, Marc, 1948- photographer
    • Thall, Bob, photographer
    • Wolke, Jay, photographer
    • Younker, Richard, photographer

This collection was processed originally in 1991 by Julie Liu and Kate Ruhl, and catalog records and finding aids were created for each contributing artist, but an overall finding aid for the collection was not created.

In 2013, the collection was reorganized into 32 series--each series representing an individual artist with the final series including the portraits of the photographers commissioned for the project--and boxes of like materials were consolidated as much as possible. Boxes were renumbered to run consecutively throughout the collection, and folders were relabeled to reflect changes. Likewise, the PCP, PCN, and PCT call numbers were reassigned, and the b&w negatives were moved into cold storage with the color negatives and share the same PCN call number.

The new collection-level finding aid uses the artist's biographical data found in the 1991 artist-level finding aids. Subject headings come from the catalog records for the individual artists. The summaries and lists of items for each artist were adapted from the old finding aids and improved.

As of February 2014, two 20 x 24 inch archival storage boxes were not located (boxes 33 and 34). According to the original artist-level finding aids, these should contain the b&w exhibition photographs of Susan Crocker and Bob Thall (20 items per box).

Note: The count of 2201 b&w photographic prints includes the 40 missing prints, as well as the 34 artists' portraits commissioned for the exhibit. Also, one non-graphic item was missing from Richard Younker's materials; it is believed to be a copy of the Chicago Reader newspaper.

The collection is arranged physically by media and organized into 32 series, 31 of which represent each of the photographers individually and in alphabetical order. The final series includes portraits of the photographers commissioned for the exhibition.

Series 1. Photographs by Thomas F. Arndt, 1987-1988

Arndt's work prints show day and night scenes of urban life in Chicago's downtown Loop area. Includes black and white photographs of individuals and families on the streets, at the beach and lakefront, in cafes and restaurants, interiors of public buildings, transportation, and portraits. Series includes work prints.

Series 2. Photographs by David Avison, 1987

Panoramic images of activities at Chicago's lakefront, beaches, and harbors, including the annual Air and Water Show, sand sculpture competition and chess pavilion at North Avenue Beach, children playing and flying kites at Montrose Harbor, and a Chinese rally and concert at Grant Park. Other locations photographed are: Diversey Harbor, Fullerton Beach, Lincoln Park and Lincoln Park Zoo, Oak Street Beach, and Belmont/Lake Shore Drive. Series includes color work and exhibition prints.

Series 3. Photographs by Dick Blau, 1983-1988

Black and white photographs show people and performers at events featuring Chicago-style polka music. Most are action shots of bands and dancers at various Chicago area dance halls and other venues hosting polka festivals and clubs. The Cinderella Ball, Cicero American League, Fan Club, Glendora House, Hall of Fame, and Polish Highlanders are included. Other images are religious scenes, urban landscapes including both commercial and residential areas, and exhibition prints of a wedding. Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 4. Photographs by Jay Boersma, 1987

Photographs focus on the built environment of Chicago's southern suburbs, such as Homewood (Ill.). Includes views of buildings, streets, automobiles, gas stations, commercial signs, automotive supply houses, railroad tracks, stores, schools, churches, residences, vacant buildings, and restaurants that are common to the suburban landscape. Series includes color work and exhibition prints.

Series 5. Photographs by Patty Carroll, 1987

Images of Chicago-area hot dog stands, shacks and trailers. Brightly colored, original, mom-and-pop shops, and those of a uniquely Chicago-style are highlighted with a focus on those in Chicago's ethnic neighborhoods. Series includes glossy, color, exhibition prints and color transparencies (slides).

Series 6. Photographs by Barbara Ciurej / Lindsay Lochman, 1987-1988

Images show suburban architecture and landscapes taken by a two-person team, Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman. The stark b&w photographs focus on corporate buildings, farm fields, subdivision housing, and structures found in Chicago's newer west and northwest suburbs, including Buffalo Grove, Deerfield, Hoffmann Estates, Naperville, Oak Brook, Palatine, and Schaumburg. Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 7. Photographs by Kathleen Collins, 1987-1988

Photographic portraits of individual employees of the Chicago Boiler Company located on Clybourn Avenue in Chicago. Images show industrial workers including welders, machine operators and sandblasters on the job prior to the company's relocation to the suburbs. Series includes only color exhibition prints.

Series 8. Photographs by Kerry Coppin, 1987

Images of the African American experience in Chicago including scenes from the Black Rose Awards Luncheon; a graduation from South Shore Community Academy; Kocoa's Kitchen, a restaurant at 7822 South Kenwood; outdoor events such as street fairs and the annual Taste of Chicago; private parties, balls, and receptions at weddings; and other events. Also includes portraits of Black Chicagoans. Series includes b&w work and exhibition prints.

Series 9. Photographs by Susan Crocker, 1987

Black & white images of structural steel workers (ironworkers) performing work on two downtown Chicago construction sites: 900 North Michigan Avenue and 35 West Wacker Drive, the Leo Burnett Building. These are primarily action shots of work on the skyscrapers but also include portraits, scenes from apprentice school, break time, and a party for members of Local #1. Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 10. Photographs by David Dapogny, 1987-1988

Black & white photographs show a variety of Chicago parades, festivals, street fairs, and city-sponsored events. Spectators and performers are featured against the cityscape. Events include the Taste of Chicago, McDonald's Christmas Parade, St. Patrick's Day, Christmas around the World (at Museum of Science and Industry), Fourth of July, India Parade, Italian Fest, Japan Day, and River Festival. Series includes copy negatives, work and exhibition prints. Restriction: Advance appointment required to view b&w negatives in cold storage.

Series 11. Photographs by Lloyd DeGrane, 1985-1988

Images of individuals, couples, and family groups watching television in their homes in a variety of contrasting neighborhoods, residential settings, and age groups. Includes locations on the South Side of Chicago, its southern suburbs, and northwestern Indiana. Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 12. Photographs by Meg Gerken, 1987-1988

Black & white images of two families: one extended-family living in the Henry Horner Homes on the 1800 block of West Washington Street, a Chicago Housing Authority public housing project, and one small family living in a Chicago suburb. Images show family members in various interactions. Includes scenes of birthday parties, managing health issues, multigenerational relations, and sisters. Series includes work prints.

Series 13. Photographs by Ron Gordon, 1987-1988

Black & white images taken on or near Chicago waterways, including landscape views of the Chicago River and the Calumet River. Images depict bridges, barges, tankers and other watercraft, structures, salt and scrap piles, fishing and pollution control scenes, in addition to bridge tenders and workers. Series includes copy negatives, work and exhibition prints. Restriction: Advance appointment required to view b&w negatives in cold storage.

Series 14. Photographs by Peter Hales, 1987-1988

Black and white documentary photographs of people attending a variety of society events such as balls, benefits and galas. Includes coverage of the Alzheimer's Benefit Ball and the Presentation Ball at the Chicago Hilton; Black Creativity Ball and Columbian Ball at the Museum of Science and Industry; Crystal Ball Benefit at McCormick Place; Heart Ball and Midwinter Ball at the Drake Hotel; Preservation Ball at the Auditorium Theater; Tiffany Ball at the Field Museum of Natural History; Chicago Historical Society gala reopening; Remains Theater benefit; event celebrating Chicago Symphony Orchestra conductor Sir George Solti's birthday; and events related to Chicago's Lyric Opera. Series includes copy negatives, work and exhibition prints. Restriction: Advance appointment required to view b&w negatives in cold storage.

Series 15. Photographs by Tom Harney, 1987-1988

Black and white documentary photographs of old Comiskey Park, stadium of the Chicago's American League baseball team, before it was demolished in 1991. Includes images of Chicago White Sox fans, the playing field, the exterior of the ballpark, vendors, and employees. Includes the "Save our Sox" campaign to halt demolition of the old ballpark. Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 16. Photographs by Tom Hocker, 1987-1988

Documentary photographs of the Hispanic population in East Chicago (Ind.). People are shown eating; working as laborers or repairing cars; participating in recreational activities, such as parades and weight training; in an operating room; and at a wedding. Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 17. Photographs by James Iska, 1986-1988

Photographs taken at the Hans Christian Andersen Elementary School, at 1148 North Honore in Chicago's West Town community area. Includes scenes from second through sixth grade and special education classrooms, the first day of school, the last day of school, graduation ceremonies for the kindergarten and eighth grade classes, gym class, playground scenes, portraits, special events, teachers, and strike activities. Children attending the school come from an ethnically diverse inner city neighborhood, including African Americans and Hispanics. Series includes work prints.

Series 18. Photographs by Angela Kelly, 1987-1988

Documentary photographs of teenage girls ages fifteen to eighteen, often single parents, at the Chrysalis Learning Center in Chicago, a non-traditional educational facility that closed in 1987. Includes images of the school, girls in their homes, bedrooms and bathrooms, in the hospital, with their babies, and interacting with other students. Series includes b&w work prints.

Series 19. Photographs by John Kimmich, 1987-1989

Documentary photographs of the Chicago Loop downtown commercial district, including images of pedestrians, people working, an "El" elevated CTA train, buildings, street scenes, and mourners for Harold Washington, Chicago's first African American mayor. Series includes b&w work and exhibition prints.

Series 20. Photographs by Jay King, 1987-1988

Documentary photographs focusing on people in Chicago's Lincoln Park neighborhood, specifically near DePaul University. Includes primarily street scenes depicting residents and visitors of all ages and demographics engaging in normal daily life at various Lincoln Park locations. Series includes b&w work and exhibition prints.

Series 21. Photographs by Stephen Marc, 1987-1988

Images portray scenes of everyday life in African American communities on Chicago's South Side. Includes recreational activities, such as playing cards, playing pool and playing chess; street scenes; graffiti; religious activities; youth; and informal portraits. Series includes b&w work prints.

Series 22. Photographs by Rhondal McKinney, 1985-1987

Images of sites found in Chicago’s southwestern suburbs along the historic Illinois and Michigan Canal. Towns depicted include Lemont and Joliet. Includes images of historic sights, buildings such as churches, restaurants, retail stores, industrial plants, gas stations, and public buildings, along with landscape views of fields, railways and empty lots. Series includes b&w work and exhibition prints.

Series 23. Photographs by James Newberry, 1987

Documentary photographs concerning ethnic traditions of Chicago's Palestinian, Indian, Iranian, and Asian communities. Images include group shots of family members at family-owned businesses, such as local ethnic stores, restaurants and bakeries; residents and customers posed for photos in neighborhood shops; group portraits of families at home, at religious activities; marriages; students at school; a martial arts studio, automobiles, and musicians. Series includes: color transparencies, negatives, work and exhibition prints, and b&w Xerox copies of a portion of the work prints.

Series 24. Photographs by Antonio Perez, 1987-1988

Documentary photographs primarily depict the Hispanic community on Chicago's South Side. Includes images of dances, Halloween, parades, religious activities, schools, storefronts, storekeepers, a train, weddings, Vietnam War veterans, scenes in Calumet Park on Chicago's lakefront, and Hispanic youths. Series includes b&w work prints.

Series 25. Photographs by Tom Petrillo, 1987-1988

Views of Sears Tower, at 233 South Wacker Drive, the tallest office building in Chicago, with special emphasis on business people, entrances, lobbies, foliage decoration, the skydeck observation floor, and a nearby elevated train stop. Features colorful action shots of people conducting their daily activities in and around the building. Series includes both work and exhibition prints.

Series 26. Photographs by Russell B. Phillips, 1983-1988

Documentary photographs of storefronts and street scenes on Chicago's north side from a variety of ethnic, social, and economic areas. Colorful images of bars, restaurants, retail shops, and other establishments show the signage, decoration, pedestrians, and transportation particular to each area. Locations cover neighborhoods around main thoroughfares such as North Lincoln Avenue, West Belmont Avenue, North Clark Street, and North Ashland Avenue. Series includes color work slides and exhibition prints.

Series 27. Photographs by Melissa Ann Pinney, 1987-1988

Documentary photographs depict Chicago women and girls preparing for significant life events. Images of females, old and young, in beauty salons and dressing rooms, involved in ritual preparations for weddings, parties, and daily life. Includes scenes of mothers and their daughters, and some of the events involved. Series includes color work prints.

Series 28. Photographs by Marc PoKempner, 1987-1988

Documentary photographs depict primarily African American residents, notably families and teenagers, living in Chicago's Cabrini Green, a Chicago Housing Authority housing project. Includes images of daily life, interior and exterior shots, and holiday celebrations such as Christmas. Series includes b&w work and exhibition prints.

Series 29. Photographs by Bob Thall, 1987

Thall's b&w photographs of southeast Chicago to Gary (Ind.) show the decline of the steel industry and its effect on the landscape. Images concentrate on abandoned industrial plants, empty lots, gas stations, homes, railroads and waterways found in communities along Lake Michigan from 79th Street in Chicago to Gary, Indiana. Also includes images of steel plants in Gary (Ind.). Series includes work and exhibition prints.

Series 30. Photographs by Jay Wolke, 1987

Documentary photographs of Chicago's Maxwell Street market district, an open-air flea market. Includes images of shoppers, pedestrians, vendors, peddlers, street musicians, and events. Photographs show primarily African American and Hispanic American people. Series includes color exhibition prints.

Series 31. Photographs by Richard Younker, 1988

Documentary photographs of Chicago's Polish American community, including images of Bacik's Deli at 7744-46 North Milwaukee Avenue, Pola Foods at 2303 West Cermak Road, parades, schools, street scenes, religious activities, weddings, cemetery visits, and a tire repair shop. Events include the Polish Day Parade, Memorial Day, and a visiting cardinal from Poland. Series includes b&w work and exhibition prints.

Series 32. Photographic portraits of the photographers

Black and white photographic portraits of the 33 photographers involved in the Changing Chicago photodocumentary project, sponsored by the Focus/Infinity Fund of Chicago. The portraits were included in the project's publication. Images of: Tom Arndt, David Avison, Dick Blau, Jay Boersma, Wayne Cable, Patty Carroll, Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman, Kathleen Collins, Kerry Coppin, Susan Crocker, David Dapogny, Lloyd DeGrane, Meg Gerken, Ron Gordon, Peter Hales (2), Tom Harney, Tom Hocker, Jim Iska, Angela Kelly, John Kimmich, Jay King, Rhondal McKinney, Stephen Marc, James Newberry, Antonio Perez, Tom Petrillo, Russell B. Phillips, Melissa Ann Pinney, Marc PoKempner, Bob Thall, Jay Wolke (2 versions), and Richard Younker.