• IdentificationMSSchw70
  • TitleCharles Phineas Schwartz papers MSSchw70
  • PublisherSpecial Collections
  • LanguageEnglish
  • RepositorySpecial Collections
  • Physical Description4.5 Linear feet
  • Date1915-1970
  • AbstractPart of the Jane Addams Memorial Collection. Charles P. Schwartz (1887-1975) was an attorney, civic leader, and educator in the social welfare movement. Schwartz served as chairman of the State of Illinois Committee on Citizenship and Naturalization and wrote many pamphlets for new citizens. Schwartz also served as president of the City Club of Chicago and in 1936, he was chairman of the Illinois Independent Committee for Franklin D. Roosevelt. Before beginning his law practice in Chicago, Schwartz was secretary to Judge Julian W. Mack who established the first juvenile court in the city. Finally, Schwartz was a friend and lawyer to Jane Addams. He was vice president, trustee, and counsel to Hull-House. The collection contains correspondence, newspaper clippings, newsletters, photographs, pamphlets, and reports. The materials pertain to Hull-House, the City Club of Chicago, the Chicago Bar Association, civil rights, and citizenship. Finding aid available. Acquired from Charles P. Schwartz.
  • OriginationSchwartz, Charles P. (Charles Phineas), b. 1886

Old Resource ID was CSchwartz

Charles Phineas Schwartz was born to Moses and Anna (Frankfort) Schwartz in Vilna Poland [now Lithuania] in 1886. His family immigrated to Norway, Michigan. Schwartz graduated from the University of Chicago in 1908 and earned his JD from the University of Chicago Law School in 1909. Schwartz married Lavinia "Duffy" Schulman on October 20, 1920. Lavinia and Charles had three children: Polly (Mrs. Polly Hertz), Robert A. D., and Charles P. Jr.

Schwartz was official secretary to Julian W. Mack, Judge Illinois Appellate Court from 1909 to 1910. Judge Mack established the first juvenile court in Chicago. It was through Julian Mack that Schwartz was introduced to Hull-House and its founder Jane Addams. Schwartz was a resident of Hull-House for several years, serving as counsel to the Hull-House Association and as Jane Addams' legal counsel until her death in 1935. As legal counsel, Schwartz advised Jane Addams and other residents about estate donations to Hull-House. Schwartz's life-long passion for citizenship education, immigration, and teaching English as a second language, was nurtured through his relationships with Hull-House residents Julia Lathrop, and Grace and Edith Abbott.

Schwartz also worked for citizenship causes through governmental agencies and commissions. Schwartz served as an appeal agent for the Selective Service Commission during World War I and II. He also served as chairman of the Illinois Committee on Citizenship and Naturalization in the 1930s and wrote pamphlets and articles on the subject. In 1968, Charles and Lavinia donated $100,000 to establish the Charles P. & Lavinia S. Schwartz Citizen Project in the Graduate School of Education at the University of Chicago. Schwartz was chairman of the Illinois Independent Committee for Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1936, and his political friendships included Harold Ickes and Adlai Stevenson.

Charles Schwartz's dedication to social justice and ethical concerns was also rooted in his Jewish faith. Schwartz advocated that lay persons had an active role to play in institutional Judaism at a time in which many American Jews were becoming increasingly secular. Schwartz was a member of the KAM synagogue and delivered sermons at KAM and Beth Am congregations. In the 1930s and 1940s, Schwartz was also involved in debates regarding the response to anti-Semitism and the plight of European Jews; as well as the role of religious education in public schools.

Schwartz was an enthusiastic and dedicated alumnus of the University of Chicago and its law school through his adult life. As a member of the Citizens Board, the University of Chicago Law School Alumni Association, and in later years the Emeritus Club, Schwartz raised funds for scholarships and university buildings. Schwartz maintained friendships with Law School classmates such as James Pope, through correspondence, reunions, and other Alumni functions.

Schwartz' s career as a lawyer is visible through his participation in professional organizations, the Illinois and Chicago Bar Associations. Schwartz's work with the Chicago Bar Association included participation in the Civil Rights committee which focussed on issues such as Housing, the Civil Rights Bill of 1965, Police-Community relations, and Newsman's Privilege. Schwartz also worked as an attorney for the firm Knapp & Campbell; was counsel for United States Steel Co.; a partner at the firm Zeisler & Schwartz; and General Counsel and Vice-President for A.S. Schulman Electric company.

In addition to his social reform and religious interests, Charles Schwartz was an active member in the City Club of Chicago and served as its President from 1935-36. In the 1960s, the City Club of Chicago was dedicated to improving public transportation and rebuilding McCormick Place. Schwartz was also a member of the Cliff Dwellers club, the Quadrangle Club, and the Arts Club of Chicago.

Charles Schwartz was a gregarious man who valued his relationships with family and friends. This dedication is revealed through his relationship with his son, Charles P. Jr., and in photos of his wife, children, and colleagues.

This collection reflects Charles P. Schwartz's relationship to Jane Addams and Hull-House. It also documents Charles P. Schwartz's activities in alumni associations of the University of Chicago and its law school including the Citizens Board, the University of Chicago Law School Alumni Association and the Emeritus Club; his participation in the professional organizations the Illinois and Chicago Bar Associations, his work with the City Club of Chicago, his involvement in citizenship education with the Illinois Committee on Citizenship and Naturalization and the Charles P. & Lavinia S. Schwartz Citizen Project in the Graduate School of Education in the University of Chicago; and his membership with the KAM congregation.

This collection includes legal documents, correspondence, articles, programs, mailing lists, minutes, and annual reports for the Hull-House and Hull-House Association. This collection also includes correspondence, legal documents, financial records, mailing lists, articles, pamphlets, and newspaper clippings for the Chicago and Illinois Bar Association, the City Club of Chicago, the Citizens Board, the University of Chicago Law School Alumni Association, and the Emeritus Club. Correspondence includes letters by Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jane Addams, Ellen Gates Starr, Alice Hamilton, and Adlai Stevenson. This collection includes photographs and awards.

Unarranged papers were accessioned as they were received. In 2002, the accessions were combined and arranged by the cataloger.

This collection is divided into two series:

Series 1. Hull-House and Hull-House Association --1915-1974

Series 2. Professional and Personal Papers --1909-1975

The Charles P. Schwartz papers were donated to the University of Illinois at Chicago, Main Library, Special Collections, as six accessions between 1970-1977. Charles P. Schwartz donated Hull-House real estate and legal documents in 1970. Lavinia "Duffy" Schwartz donated Charles Schwartz's memorial program in 1975. Correspondence between Jane Addams and Charles Schwartz was received in 1976. The remainder of the collection was donated in 1977.

Charles Phineas Schwartz papers, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago

  • Names
    • Chicago Bar Association.
    • City Club of Chicago.
    • Hull-House (Chicago, Ill.).
    • Schwartz, Charles P. (Charles Phineas), b. 1886 -- Archives
  • Subject
    • Chicago Political and Civic Life.
    • Citizenship.
    • Civil rights.
    • Lawyers.
  • Geographic Coverage
    • Illinois--Chicago.
    • United States.